NewsBreak – Scottish High Court Rules U.K. Prorogation Unlawful

© Reuters.  © Reuters.

Investing.com – Three judges on the Scottish High Court ruled that U.K. Prime Minister’s Boris Johnson’s decision to suspend parliament is unlawful. An appeal is expected to be heard in the Supreme Court on Tuesday.

• rose 0.1% to 1.2356 as of 5:23 AM ET (9:23 GMT).

• fell 0.2% to 0.8921.

• The yield rose 5.5% to 0.674.

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Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.

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Forex News

Brazil and Argentina renew rivalry on Pan Am handball court

By Steve Keating

LIMA (Reuters) – Whether soccer or basketball, a World Cup or an Olympics, the Brazil-Argentina rivalry is one of the greatest in sport and it played out again on Tuesday on the Pan Am Games women’s handball court.

The two countries can work themselves into a lather with nothing more than pride on the line but the stakes were much higher at a seething Videna Sports Center, with a gold medal and direct qualification for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics going to the winner.

This round went to Brazil, who broke open what had been a tight contest with a second half surge, cruising to a 30-21 win to punch their Tokyo ticket.

It was the 11th gold of the Games for Brazil, keeping them in front of their bitter rivals who sit eighth in the standings.

The United States continued their gold medal rampage, improving their haul to 28 after just four days with Mexico a distant second on 13 followed by Brazil.

The U.S. grabbed gold on land, sea and air on Tuesday, led by Karissa Cook and Jace Pardon who capped an unbeaten run to the women’s beach volleyball gold with a 14-21 22-20 15-10 win over defending champions Argentina.

Gymnast Riley McCusker was flying high at the Polideportivo Villa El Salvador, taking top spot on the uneven bars finals while weightlifter Sarah Robles picked up gold with victory in the women’s over-87kg division.

Timothy Sherry in the 50 meter rifle and Brian Burrows in the trap were on target in the men’s shooting competition while waterskier Regina Jaquess added her third gold to the U.S. cause by winning the overall women’s title.

After a slow start, Canada finally found its gold medal mojo, doubling their total from four to eight to leap up the leaderboard.

Gymnast Ellie Black, Canada’s most decorated athlete at the 2015 Pan Am Games, is well on her way to repeating that performance. She picked up a second gold and third medal in three days by winning the vault event.

The 23-year-old also took bronze in the uneven bars to take her tally to four medals for these Games and nine over the last two Pan Ams.

Black led Canada to a team silver on Saturday then on Monday successfully defended her all-around crown.

“We wanted to deliver some strong performances and we were able to do that,” said Black. “It is awesome to bring some more medals home for Canada.”

It was a big day in the canoes for Canada with Alanna Bray-Lougheed and Andreanne Langlois triumphing in the women’s K2 500m and Dominik Crete getting home first in the men’s K1 200m sprint.

Dorien Llewellyn triumphed in the men’s overall water skiing competition.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.

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Sports and General News

Georgia’s court system struck by hackers using ransomware

Yet another U.S. agency has fallen victim to ransom demands by internet hackers. A state court representative told CBS affiliate WGCL-TV that over the weekend it was discovered that hackers had found their way into the Georgia court system, knocking the entire system offline.

Computers at the Georgia Administrative Office of the Courts were the ones infected. A spokesman for the state said the hack was discovered Saturday morning. He also confirmed hackers used ransomware, holding several state court systems hostage. Ransomware is a type of malware technology that blocks users from accessing computer systems or files until a ransom is paid. 

Many of Georgia citizens who could have filed court documents online have instead had to do it in person following the cyber issues. The state court’s network is completely offline following the hack, and a representative of the court said there’s no evidence that any personal information is at risk. 

Trending News

This malware attack marks yet another incident this year where a public institution is held hostage by an online extortion attack. In June, the Riviera Beach City Council in Florida agreed to pay $ 600,000 in ransom to hackers who took over its computer system, disabling its email system and preventing 911 dispatchers from entering calls into a computer. That same week the Mayor of Lake City, Florida agreed to pay hackers $ 460,000 who had frozen city worker’s out of the email system.

cyberattack.jpg
A screenshot of the warning screen from a purported ransomware attack, as captured by a computer user in Taiwan, is seen on laptop in Beijing, Saturday, May 13, 2017.  AP

Even airports and college applicants are at risk. In April, Cleveland Hopkins Airport suffered extended power outage issues that plagued its computers. A person familiar with the matter confirmed to CBS News that an “outside entity” was believed to be behind the outage. In March, applicants at Grinnell, Hamilton and Oberlin colleges reportedly received ransom notes from hackers claiming to have accessed their application files. The hackers initially asked for $ 3,890 in bitcoin payments. 

Last year, a ransomware cyberattack crippled the city of Atlanta, shutting down the city’s computer systems and stalling operations at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport. The culprits demanded the equivalent of about $ 51,000 in bitcoin to unlock the systems. 

The attack on Georgia’s court system follows the same pattern as the other extortion attempts, which are increasingly successful due to any large agency’s reliance on digital technology. Cyber expert Greg Evans told WGCL-TV the hackers could have potentially been inside the Georgia court system well before the ransomware was discovered. In fact, he said in many cases ransomware is used to cover other illegal cyber activity.

“If a hacker then takes those IP logs and deletes them or encrypts them, then you can’t get to them,” Evans said.

Evans said the criminal responsible for this hack may not be a hacker themselves. He said tracking down the person responsible for the hack is extremely difficult due to multiple layers of online encryptions.

“There are websites out there that will rent you ransomware. Either you can pay them a flat fee or they will work off of commission and you give them who the target is, how much you want to charge,” he said.

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U.S. – CBSNews.com

Russian court puts ex-shareholder of Yugra Bank under house arrest

Russian court puts ex-shareholder of Yugra Bank under house arrest Russian court puts ex-shareholder of Yugra Bank under house arrest

MOSCOW (Reuters) – A Russian court said on Friday it had ruled that a former shareholder of Yugra Bank should be held under house arrest until June 18.

Alexei Khotin was detained earlier on Friday on suspicion of embezzling 7.5 billion rubles ($ 117 million) from Yugra Bank, whose license was withdrawn by the Russian Central Bank in 2017.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.

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Economy News

Manafort apologizes to the court — live updates

CBSN

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort apologized in court, as he faced his sentencing in the District of Columbia on two counts — conspiracy against the United States and conspiracy to obstruct justice on Wednesday.

“I want to say to you now that I am sorry for what I have done,” Manafort said.”While I cannot undo the past, I can assure that the future will be very different.”

His attorney, Kevin Downing, also argued that the media attention had resulted in had resulted a “very harsh process” for his client, different from the treatment another defendant facing the same charges might receive from the public and the press. Judge Amy Berman Jackson prompted him to state that he doesn’t believe prosecutors were motivated by politics.

The prosecution arguing for a tough sentence, that Manafort’s crimes, conducted over a decade and bringing him wealth that he hid in 30 offshore accounts in three countries, showed that he “sought to undermine, not promote, American ideals.”

Each count against him carries a maximum of five years.

In Virginia last week, Manafort was sentenced to 47 months for tax and bank fraud, a significantly shorter sentence than prosecutors had sought.

Manafort pleaded guilty to the two conspiracy counts in the District in September in order to avoid a second trial and was required to cooperate with special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. But in November, the government accused Manafort of violating the plea agreement in November by lying to the FBI, a federal grand jury and the special counsel. U.S. District Court Judge Amy Berman Jackson agreed and ruled that Manafort had voided the deal.

With reporting by Clare Hymes and Steven Portnoy. Grace Segers, Kathryn Watson and Rob Legare contributed to this report.

Follow along with live updates here:

Jackson criticizes Manafort’s defense

Jackson is now essentially mocking the defense lawyers for repeatedly referencing what she calls the “No Collusion refrain” in their filings. The question of Russian collusion is “unrelated to the matters at hand,” Jackson said.

“The ‘No Collusion’ mantra is simply a non-sequitur,” Jackson added. It’s “just one more thing that’s inconsistent with any genuine acceptance of responsibility.”

“The defendant was not in the SHU!” Jackson said, referring to the acronym for Special Housing Unit, better known as solitary confinement. She blasted the Manafort defense team for making it seem as though Manafort was in solitary confinement.

Jackson: Manafort showed no remorse before sentencing

Jackson said of Manafort’s pre-sentence filings that they stressed the impact of the prosecution on him and his family: “‘Look what they’ve done to me.'”

She saw no sign of remorse prior to his sentencing — it was “completely absent” from the submissions, Jackson said.

Jackson: “No explanation” from Manafort would warrant leniency he has requested

Jackson said that Manafort was neither “public enemy number one” nor is he a “victim,” adding that the case has been marked by a fair amount of “hyperbole” on both sides.

Jackson, speaking to the special counsel’s investigation, said that Russian collusion was “not presented” in this case, and therefore not resolved by it, one way or the other.

She lambasted Manafort for his “lies” and “fraud.”

“It is hard to overstate the number of lies and the amount of fraud and the extraordinary amount of money involved” in Manafort’s crimes, she said.

She said there is “no explanation” from Manafort that would warrant the leniency he has requested.

Jackson said Manafort was “hiding the truth of who he represented from policymakers and the public,” behaving in a way that “undermines our political discourse and infects our policymaking.”

And even now, she said Manafort still isn’t being straight with her. He acted through the proceeding, after his guilty plea, with an “‘I’m just gonna manage this, I’m just gonna spin this’ attitude,” she said.

His “dissembling in this case began with the bond proceedings and it never abated,” she told the court.

Jackson says Manafort had “contempt for” and “believed he had the right to manipulate these proceedings.” She said his lies can’t be ignored because “court is one of those places where facts still matter.”

“He did plead guilty. He did sit for many sessions,” Jackson said. “But the problem is, the defendant’s own conduct makes it impossible to assess” how truthful his testimony was. “There’s no question that this defendant knew better, and he knew exactly what he was doing.”

–Steven Portnoy

Manafort: “I am sorry for what I have done”

Speaking from his wheelchair, Manafort reiterated the feeling of shame he has, which he mentioned in court last week, but today he added an explicit apology.

“I want to say to you now that I am sorry for what I have done,” Manafort said. “While I cannot undo the past, I can assure that the future will be very different.”

Manafort continued, “I concede I did not always behave in ways that supported my core values.”

“I say to you in the future that my behavior will be very different. I have already begun to change,” he said. Manafort told the court that the support of friends and family during his case have “had an energizing impact on my life,” and he claimed that he is a “different person from the one who came before you” in the fall of 2017.

Steven Portnoy

Defense: Manafort “truly is sorry” for breaking the law

Defense attorney Kevin Downing argued that “[Manafort] truly is sorry for violating the law.”

Downing claimed that Manafort and his employee Konstantin Kilimnik were in regular communication about their alleged activities in Ukraine inside the U.S. Embassy in Kiev, an argument he offered as a mitigating factor. This portion of the argument referenced sealed portions of the case that were redacted from court filings.

He argued that the media attention on Manafort had resulted a “very harsh process” for his client, different from the treatment another defendant facing the same charges might receive from the public and the press.

“Everybody’s going nuts over this,” Downing lamented. He suggested that there had been a “political motivation” for what he sees as an “out-of-whack” level of attention to the case. Jackson then prompted Downing to say on the record for the court that he doesn’t believe the prosecutors were motivated by politics.

–Steven Portnoy

Prosecutor: Manafort sought to undermine American ideals

“Your honor, we’re here today because of crimes that Paul Manafort committed for over a decade,” Weissmann declared. “He hid his wealth in over 30 offshore accounts in three different countries.”

Some of the work he did was on behalf of Russian oligarch Oleg Derpisaka, Weissmann said, adding that Manafort financially supported his friends and family “with other people’s money.”

“Mr. Manafort committed crimes that undermined our political process,” Weissmann said.

Weissman noted that Manafort was familiar with his obligation to register as a foreign agent, but “that law got in the way of Mr. Manafort,” he said. “Secrecy was integral.”

“As we noted to the court,” Weissman added, the Justice Department had audited Manafort’s work, and Manafort was forced to decline a presidential appointment under President Reagan because he had been audited by the Justice Department for his work for overseas clients.

“It is hard to imagine a more righteous prosecution of this act,” Weissmann said.

Weissmann says Manafort’s belated 2017 FARA (Foreign Agent Registration Act) filing was “woefully false and incomplete,” omitting his work for Ukraine and pro-Russian politician Viktor Yanukovych.

“It neither would, could or should be absolution for a criminal prosecution,” Weissman said. He went on to argue that Manafort’s crimes, including witness tampering, “go to the heart of the American criminal justice system.” His decision to tamper with witnesses while under indictment and out on bail suggests “something that is wrong” with his moral compass.

Manafort, Weissman said as he concluded his argument for a tough sentence that Manafort “sought to undermine, not promote, American ideals.”

Defense: Manafort didn’t “back away” from plea deal

“Our view is that he did not back away” from his plea agreement, Manafort defense lawyer Tom Zehnle told Judge Jackson. “Mr. Manafort has come forward — he’s accepted responsibility by pleading guilty,” he added. This argument is relevant to Jackson’s determination of whether Manafort has accepted responsibility for his crimes.

Special counsel prosecutor Andrew Weissmann argued that Manafort had made false statements to the FBI and under oath to the grand jury “repeatedly.” Weismann told Judge Jackson that Manafort “engaged in deceitful conduct, both with the FBI and under oath.”

Jackson said that she can consider conduct beyond what was cited in the offense. “Given his plea and given his sworn admissions” she said she would give him credit for acceptance of responsibility.

–Steven Portnoy and Clare Hymes

Judge Jackson explains the sentencing process

9:40 a.m: Judge Jackson notes the statutory maximum sentence for the two charges Manafort has pleaded guilty to in the District is ten years in total.

She said a “considerable amount of algebra” goes into the calculation of the recommended guidelines for a sentence in this case.

“There are boundaries to what sentence can be imposed,” Judge Jackson explained. She noted that the tax crimes, FBAR (Foreign Bank and Financial Reports), and bank fraud crimes were not tried in the District court and that he had received a concurrent sentence for his offenses in the Eastern District of Virginia.

“What is happening today,” she said “cannot be a review or revision,” of what happened at last week’s sentencing in Virginia.

In count 1, Manafort pleaded guilty to conspiracy against the U.S.

In count 2, Manafort pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice for witness tampering.

There will be “overlapping sentencing for overlapping counts” Jackson said.

–Steven Portnoy and Clare Hymes

Will Jackson credit Manafort for accepting responsibility?

9:35 a.m.: Before issuing her sentence, Judge Jackson said she’ll have to decide whether to credit Manafort for his “acceptance of responsibility.” This process took awhile in Judge T.S. Ellis’s courtroom last week in Virginia.

Jackson told the court she’ll also have to determine whether Manafort was a leader in the conspiracy. Weissman said that Manafort had claimed he was not a leader,

She addressed Manafort’s role in the offense, saying the probation office had in fact designated him as a “organizer or leader of a criminal activity.” But the defense argued that this standard only applies to criminal organization. Jackson said that there are no rules saying that Manafort’s employees must be “solely” involved in a criminal enterprise. She says this comes down to a group, including how many people are involved and who is in charge. Jackson said she doesn’t believe this is a “valid argument,” saying that the number of people involved far exceeds five.

On Manafort’s acceptance of responsibility, Judge Jackson spoke to the breach of plea agreement and said she still finds that Manafort gave false testimony regarding his interactions with Kilimnik.

–Steven Portnoy and Clare Hymes

Judge Jackson takes the bench

9:31 a.m.: Judge Amy Berman Jackson has taken the bench. Court is in session.

Manafort team arrives for hearing

9:28 a.m.: Manafort defense attorney Kevin Downing and his team have taken their seats in the District courthouse.

Before the hearing, prosecutors and defense attorneys mingled. Downing was seen smiling as he spoke with special counsel prosecutor Jeannie Rhee. Manafort is wearing a suit and was been wheeled into the courtroom in a wheelchair at 9:25 a.m.

​Will we hear from Manafort in trial?

Potentially. Manafort, who had never addressed the court on his own behalf, did so in Alexandria last week during his sentencing there.

Manafort’s allocution was brief, and even Judge T.S. Ellis noted that the statement lacked remorse, “I don’t have any doubt that what you said was genuine, but I was surprised that I did not hear you express regret for engaging in wrongful conduct.”

The Judge encouraged Manafort to think about that before speaking before the court in D.C.

— Clare Hymes

Manafort’s sentencing

What kind of sentence will Judge Amy Berman Jackson hand down against Manafort? One thing to watch is whether Jackson will allow Manafort to serve both the Virginia and the District sentences at the same time or whether he will have to serve them consecutively. Judge T.S. Ellis, who presided over the Virginia case, told Manafort’s attorneys it was up to Jackson.

And then, there’s the sentence itself in the D.C. case. Ellis’ sentence of just under five years was 14 years lower than the minimum sentence of 19 years recommended by the sentencing guidelines. Ellis said that Manafort had led an otherwise “blameless life.”

The two conspiracy counts in the District case carry a maximum of five years each.

Some expressed surprise about Judge Ellis’ assessment that Manafort had lived an otherwise blameless life.

“That was a rather remarkable comment I think, to say the least,” CBS legal analyst Rikki Klieman said following the Virginia ruling. “It’s one thing to look at his age, his health, the fact that he did not have any prior record. It is another thing to see someone engage in a life of crime for at least 10 years and call it unblemished.”

— Clare Hymes and Kathryn Watson

Manafort’s violation of plea agreement

Berman Jackson ruled that Manafort breached his plea agreement in February, meaning that the special counsel was released from its promise to support a reduced sentence for Manafort in exchange for his cooperation.

In August 2018, after being found guilty of financial crimes including bank fraud and lying on his tax returns, Manafort pleaded guilty to two additional felonies and agreed to cooperate with the government.

Then, in November, Mueller’s office told the court Manafort had lied to investigators while he was supposed to be cooperating about five aspects of the government’s investigation, most notably about his interactions with Konstantin Kilimnik, a Russian political operative with ties to the Kremlin. Jackson ruled Manafort lied to the government about three of those instances.

But Jackson was unconvinced by the special counsel’s claim that Manafort lied about Kilimnik’s role in the obstruction of justice conspiracy. She also did not find that the government had proven he intentionally lied about his communications with anyone in the Trump administration.

Kilimnik, who has ties to Russian intelligence, was indicted in June. Manafort has admitted he conspired with Kilimnik to obstruct justice.

— Clare Hymes and Rob Legare

Manafort’s Virginia sentencing last week

At his sentencing hearing in Virginia last week, Manafort was sentenced to 47 months in prison, a significantly shorter sentence than prosecutors had sought.

Judge T.S. Ellis said Manafort committed “undeniably serious” crimes and expressed surprise that Manafort did not “express regret for engaging in wrongful conduct.”

“You should have remorse for that,” Ellis said.

Ellis suggested Manafort stole more than $ 6 million from his fellow tax payers, calling it “theft of money from everyone who pays.”

But Ellis said that Manafort “lived an otherwise blameless life. “Mr. Manafort has engaged in lots of good things,” he said, though he added that that fact “can’t erase his criminal activity.”

Ultimately, Ellis concluded that the guidelines, which called for a sentence of 19.5-24 years, were “excessive.” “It’s far more important, in my view, that this case serve as a beacon to warn others,” Judge Ellis said, just before imposing a sentence of 47 months on Manafort.”

–Clare Hymes

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U.S. – CBSNews.com

Ross from “Friends” lookalike faces arrest for skipping court

London — A British judge has issued an arrest warrant for an alleged shoplifter whose striking resemblance to David Schwimmer made international headlines. Abdulah Husseni failed to appear in court in Blackpool, northwest England, on Tuesday to face charges of theft and fraud.

Husseni, 36, who lives in Slough to the west of London, was facing charges on Wednesday of theft and fraud, and is now subject to an arrest warrant issued by District Judge Jane Goodwin for his failure to show up.

He stands accused of stealing a coat, phone and wallet from someone in a restaurant in the northwest U.K. resort city of Blackpool. 

Friends_Thief_Ross Geller
Blackpool Police shared the image of the thief who bares an uncanny resemblance to actor David Schwimmer, who played Ross Geller in the 90s sitcom “Friends”  Blackpool Police

But his image became world famous after police published surveillance-camera video taken after the alleged restaurant theft of a man carrying a carton of cans of beer from a restaurant in Blackpool.

Social-media users noted a strong similarity to Ross Geller, the character played by Schwimmer on “Friends.”

The actor himself responded with a Twitter video that showed him scuttling furtively through a convenience store clutching a carton of beer. Schwimmer wrote: “Officers, I swear it wasn’t me. As you can see, I was in New York.”

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World – CBSNews.com

Huawei: Meng Wanzhou faces Iran fraud charges, court hears

Meng Wanzhou, chief financial officer of Chinese telecoms giant Huawei, is facing fraud charges relating to alleged breaking of US sanctions on Iran, a Canadian court has heard.

Details of the charges were revealed when a publication ban was lifted by a judge in Vancouver.

Ms Meng, daughter of Huawei’s founder, was arrested in the city on Saturday and faces extradition to the US.

The court is deciding whether or not to allow bail.

China has demanded Ms Meng’s release, insisting she has not violated any laws.

What happened in court?

On Friday, the Supreme Court of British Columbia was told that Ms Meng had used a Huawei subsidiary called Skycom to evade sanctions on Iran between 2009 and 2014.

They said she had publicly misrepresented Skycom as being a separate company.

Ms Meng faces up to 30 years in prison in the US if found guilty of the charges, the court heard.

Court reporters said she was not handcuffed for the hearing and was wearing a green sweatsuit.

A Canadian government lawyer said Ms Meng was accused of “conspiracy to defraud multiple financial institutions”.

He said she had denied to US bankers any direct connections between Huawei and SkyCom, when in fact “SkyCom is Huawei”.

The lawyer said Ms Meng could be a flight risk and thus should be denied bail.

Why was the arrest significant?

The arrest has put further strain on US-China relations. The two countries have been locked in trade disputes, although a 90-day truce had been agreed on Saturday – before news of the arrest came to light on Wednesday.

Huawei is one of the largest telecommunications equipment and services providers in the world, recently passing Apple to become the second-biggest smartphone maker after Samsung.

Ms Meng’s arrest was not revealed by Canadian authorities until Wednesday, the day of her first court appearance.

Details of the charges were also not revealed at the time after she was granted a publication ban by a Canadian judge.

Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland said on Friday that China had been assured that due process was being followed and Ms Meng would have consular access while her case was before the courts.

“Canada is a rule-of-law country and we follow our procedures, our laws and our agreements,” she told journalists during a press teleconference.

“Due process has been, and will be, followed in Canada.”

Ms Freeland reiterated Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s claim that Ms Meng’s arrest had “no political involvement”.

Does Huawei concern the West?

Some Western governments fear Beijing will gain access to fifth-generation (5G) mobile and other communications networks through Huawei and expand its spying ability, although the firm insists there is no government control.

Japan is expected to ban government use of products made by Huawei and ZTE over cybersecurity concerns, local media reported on Friday. It would follow moves by New Zealand and Australia to block Huawei.

US National Security Adviser John Bolton said his country has had “enormous concerns for years” about the practice of Chinese firms “to use stolen American intellectual property, to engage in forced technology transfers, and to be used as arms of the Chinese government’s objectives in terms of information technology in particular”.

“Not respecting this particular arrest, but Huawei is one company we’ve been concerned about,” he said.

What does China say?

A Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson told reporters: “The detention without giving any reason violates a person’s human rights.”

“We have made solemn representations to Canada and the US, demanding that both parties immediately clarify the reasons for the detention, and immediately release the detainee to protect the person’s legal rights.”

What are the Iran sanctions?

US President Donald Trump last month reinstated all the US sanctions on Iran that had been removed under a 2015 nuclear deal.

Mr Trump had been fiercely opposed to the deal, which saw Iran limit its controversial nuclear activities in exchange for sanctions relief.

The re-imposed sanctions hit oil exports, shipping and banks – all core parts of Iran’s economy.

Although there are some waivers, US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has said the US will “aggressively” target any firm or organisation “evading our sanctions”.

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BBC News – Technology