Hong Kong Airport have obtained an injunction to stop protestors obstructing movement

Hong Kong Airport have obtained an injunction to stop protestors obstructing movement

After two days of basically closing down the airport, efforts to restrain protestors doing so again:

  • Airport Authority Hong Kong has obtained an interim injunction to restrain persons from unlawfully and wilfully obstructing or interfering with the proper use of Hong Kong International Airport
  • Persons are also restrained from attending or participating in any demonstration or protest or public order event in the Airport other than in the area designated by the Airport Authority

Will that be enough?

After two days of basically closing down the airport, efforts to restrain protestors doing so again:

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Defiant Hong Kong protesters choke newly reopened airport

Unrest In Hong Kong During Anti-Government Protests
Protesters occupy the departure hall of the Hong Kong International Airport during a demonstration on August 13, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. Getty

Hong Kong — Protesters clogged the departure area at Hong Kong’s reopened airport Tuesday, a day after they forced one of the world’s busiest transport hubs to shut down entirely amid their calls for an independent inquiry into alleged police abuse. More than 100 flights were cancelled as thousands of protesters occupied the airport’s main terminal for the fifth consecutive day.

Flagship carrier Cathay Pacific said in a statement that it had been “informed by the Airport Authority in Hong Kong that all check-in has been suspended as a result of the public assembly at Hong Kong International Airport, which is ongoing. There is potential for further flight disruptions at short notice.”

CBS News producer Chris Liable said all scheduled flights not already checked in were cancelled, and protesters were also blocking the departure lines at immigration, so nobody was able to get through there — something the protesters hadn’t done previously.

After filling up two separate arrivals halls, demonstrators streamed into the departure area despite increased security measures designed to keep them out. Passengers struggled to get past the sitting protesters and into the immigration section.

Some flights were able to take off earlier Tuesday, relieving some of the pressure from Monday’s cancellation of more than 200 flights.

An “existential threat”?

The central government in Beijing ominously characterized the protest movement as something approaching “terrorism” that posed an “existential threat” to the local citizenry.

Hong Kong airport reopens after protests

Meanwhile, paramilitary police were assembling across the border in the city of Shenzhen for exercises in what some saw as a threat to increase force brought against the mostly young protesters who have turned out in their thousands over the past 10 weeks.

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam said the ongoing instability, chaos and violence have placed the city on a “path of no return.”

The demonstrators have shown no sign of letting up on their campaign to force Lam’s administration to respond to their demands, including that she step down and entirely scrap legislation that could have seen criminal suspects sent to mainland China to face torture and unfair or politically charged trials.

While Beijing tends to define terrorism broadly, extending it especially to nonviolent movements opposing government policies in minority regions such as Tibet and Xinjiang, the government’s usage of the term in relation to Hong Kong raised the prospect of greater violence and the possible suspension of legal rights for those detained.

While China has yet to threaten sending in the army — as it did against pro-democracy protesters in Beijing in 1989 — the exercises in Shenzhen were a further demonstration of its ability to crush the demonstrations, even at the cost to Hong Kong’s reputation as a safe haven for business and international exchange.

Images posted online showed armored personnel carriers belonging to the People’s Armed Police driving in convoy Monday toward the location of the exercises, just across the border from Hong Kong.

The People’s Liberation Army also has a garrison in Hong Kong, which recently released a video showing its units combating actors dressed as protesters. The Hong Kong police on Monday also put on a display of armored car-mounted water cannons that it plans to deploy by the middle of the month.

“Credible evidence” of police violations

Demonstrators have in recent days focused on their demand for an independent inquiry into what they call the police’s abuse of power and negligence. That followed reports and circulating video footage of violent arrests and injuries sustained by protesters.

Hong Kong protests paralyze one of Asia’s busiest airports

On Tuesday, United Nations human rights chief Michelle Bachelet urged Kong Kong authorities to investigate what she called “credible evidence” suggesting law enforcement officers had fired tear gas at protesters in ways that violate international law. Videos have emerged showing police firing gas and beanbag rounds at close range.

Some protesters have thrown bricks, eggs and flaming objects at police stations and police said they arrested another 149 demonstrators over the weekend, bringing the total to more than 700 since early June. Police say several officers have suffered burns, bruises and eye damage inflicted by protesters.

Lam told reporters Tuesday that dialogue would only begin when the violence stopped. She reiterated her support for the police and said they have had to make on-the-spot decisions under difficult circumstances, using “the lowest level of force.”

“After the violence has been stopped, and the chaotic situation that we are seeing could subside,” Lam said, “I as the chief executive will be responsible to rebuild Hong Kong’s economy … to help Hong Kong to move on.”

She did not elaborate on what steps her government will take toward reconciliation. After two months, the protests have become increasingly divisive and prompted clashes across the city.

Hong Kong hit where it hurts

The airport shutdown added to what authorities say is already a major blow to the financial hub’s crucial tourism industry.

Kerry Dickinson, a traveler from South Africa, said she had trouble getting her luggage Tuesday morning.

“I don’t think I will ever fly to Hong Kong again,” she said.

The protests early on were staged in specific neighborhoods near government offices. However, the airport protest was had a direct impact on business travel and tourism. Analysts said it could make foreign investors think twice about setting up shop in Hong Kong, which has long prided itself as being Asia’s leading business city with convenient air links across the region.

The black-clad protesters Tuesday held up signs in Simplified Chinese and English to appeal to travelers from mainland China and other parts of the world. “Democracy is a good thing,” said one sign in Simplified Chinese characters, which are used in mainland China instead of the Traditional Chinese script of Hong Kong.

Adding to the protesters’ anger, Hong Kong’s Cathay Pacific Airways told employees in a memo that the carrier has a “zero tolerance” for employees joining “illegal protests” and warned violators could be fired.

Hong Kong was promised democratic rights not enjoyed in Communist Party-ruled mainland China when Beijing took over what had been a British colony in 1997, but some have accused Beijing of steadily eroding their freedoms. Those doubts are fueling the protests, which build on a previous opposition movement that shut down much of the city for seven weeks in 2014 that eventually fizzled out and whose leaders have been imprisoned.

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Hong Kong braces for another weekend of protests

© Reuters. Anti-extradition bill demonstrators attend a protest at the arrival hall of Hong Kong Airport © Reuters. Anti-extradition bill demonstrators attend a protest at the arrival hall of Hong Kong Airport

By Clare Jim and Kevin Liu

HONG KONG (Reuters) – Hong Kong began another volatile weekend on Saturday, with anti-government protests taking place across the city, including one at the international airport for a second day.

Increasingly violent protests have plunged Hong Kong into its most serious political crisis for decades, posing a serious challenge to the central government in Beijing.

Protesters arrived back at Hong Kong’s airport, a day after a peaceful gathering there of about 1,000 activists. Neither protest disrupted flights.

Hundreds of activists occupied the arrivals hall on Saturday, some of them sitting on the floor drawing protest posters, while others politely greeted arriving passengers.

In the morning, in two separate protests, small groups of elderly Hong Kongers and families marched near the financial center’s business district. Both marches were peaceful.

About a thousand protesters also gathered later in the day in Tai Po, a town in the north of the territory.

Leung Wai Man, a housewife in her 60s, said she had been motivated to march in Tai Po because she was angry about what she saw as the violent response by police at some protests.

“We are very angry about the police arresting our teenagers,” she said. She said she was worried about escalating violence, but added that “the protesters were just trying to protect themselves against police violence.”

Hong Kong’s leader Carrie Lam said on Friday the economy was being undermined by the protests, which began in June.

China, meanwhile, demanded that the city’s flag carrier Cathay Pacific Airways (HK:) suspend staff involved in the demonstrations. One of its pilots was arrested last week.

Huarong International, the investment arm in Hong Kong of China Huarong Asset Management Co (HK:), has instructed staff not to fly Cathay Pacific if there are other options, according to an internal memo seen by Reuters and confirmed by a source at the company.

Lam’s warning about the economy and China’s targeting of a key Hong Kong business mark a toughening stance by authorities as they grapple with Hong Kong’s deepest crisis in decades.

Young people have been at the forefront of the protests, worried about the erosion of freedoms in Hong Kong by China but also concerned with issues such as wealth disparities in the city.

However, older people and parents have also been appearing at the protests.

“There are clashes in the recent protests and many parents are worried,” said Fion Yim, 35, representative of the organizing committee for what was billed as the family protest.

“The freedom to protect our children is very important. We hope to provide a safer place for parents and their kids to participate in rallies, and to voice their concerns.”

The protests began after Hong Kong’s government tried introducing an extradition bill that would have allowed defendants to be sent to mainland China for trial.

The bill has been suspended, but protesters have stepped up their demands and are now calling for greater democracy and Lam’s resignation.

The protests have been condemned by the central government in Beijing. China has also accused foreign powers of fueling the unrest.

Hong Kong was guaranteed freedoms not granted in mainland China, including an independent judiciary, under a “one country, two systems” formula, when Britain handed it back to China in 1997.

On Friday, the U.S. State department spokeswoman, Morgan Ortagus, said that Chinese media reports about a U.S. diplomat who met with Hong Kong pro-democracy leaders “have gone from irresponsible to dangerous” and must stop.

Ortagus earlier called China a “thuggish regime” for disclosing photographs and personal details of the diplomat.

More protests are planned for Sunday, including one in Sham Shui Po, a working class neighborhood that has been the scene of violent confrontations between activists and police.

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Violence escalates between Hong Kong police and protesters

Clashes involving Hong Kong’s protest movement escalated violently late Sunday as police launched tear gas at protesters who didn’t disband after a massive march and subway riders were attacked by masked assailants who appeared to target the pro-democracy demonstrators.

The firing of tear gas was the latest confrontation between police and protesters who have taken to the streets for almost two months to fight a proposed extradition bill and call for electoral reforms in the Chinese territory.

The march had been peaceful when it reached its police-designated end point in Hong Kong’s Wan Chai district in the late afternoon, but thousands continued onward, at various points occupying key government and business districts. They then headed for the Liaison Office, which represents China’s Communist Party-led central government within the city.

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Protesters threw eggs at the building and spray-painted its surrounding surveillance cameras. China’s national emblem, which adorns the front of the Liaison Office, was splattered with black ink. The Liaison Office said in comments published on Chinese state media that the acts “openly challenged the authority of the central government and touched the bottom line of the ‘one country, two systems’ principle.”

Later, police threw tear gas canisters at protesters to try to disperse them. Protesters scattered, some heading back in the direction of a key business and retail district. Police remained in place, protecting themselves with shields. Police said on their official social media accounts that protesters threw bricks and petrol bombs at them and attacked the Central police station.

Hong Kong Protests
Protesters react to teargas as they confront riot police officers in Hong Kong on Sunday, July 21, 2019. Protesters in Hong Kong pressed on Sunday past the designated end point for a march in which tens of thousands repeated demands for direct elections in the Chinese territory and an independent investigation into police tactics used in previous demonstrations. Vincent Yu / AP

Hong Kong media released video showing masked assailants attacking commuters in a subway station. Among those attacked were protesters clad in their trademark black clothing and yellow hard hats.

The attackers, meanwhile, were dressed in white with black masks pulled over their heads. On Saturday, demonstrators wore white at a counter-rally in support of police.

The Hong Kong government said in a statement shortly after midnight that commuters were attacked at a subway station in the city’s Yuen Long neighborhood, leading to “confrontations and injuries.”

The statement also said some “radical protesters initiated a series of violent acts … despite repeated warnings” by police. They said the acts included hurling petrol bombs, setting fires and throwing bricks.

Organizers said 430,000 people participated in Sunday’s march, while police said there were 138,000 during the procession’s “peak period.”

Large protests began early last month in opposition to a contentious extradition bill that would have allowed Hong Kong residents to stand trial in mainland China, where critics say their rights would be compromised.

Hong Kong’s leader, Carrie Lam, has declared the extradition bill dead, but protesters are dissatisfied with her refusal to formally withdraw the legislation. Some are also calling for her to resign amid growing concerns about the steady erosion of civil rights in the city.

While the demonstrations have been largely peaceful, some confrontations between police and protesters have turned violent. In Sha Tin district the previous Sunday, they beat each other with umbrellas and bats inside a luxury shopping center. Demonstrators broke into the Legislative Council building on July 1 by moving past barricades and shattering windows.

On Friday, Hong Kong police discovered a stash of a powerful homemade explosive in a commercial building and arrested a man. Materials voicing opposition to the extradition bill were found at the site, local media said, but a police spokesman said no concrete link had been established and the investigation was continuing.

The People’s Daily, the Communist Party’s official newspaper, condemned “radical extremists” who attacked the legislature and “trampled” on Hong Kong’s rule of law in a front-page column Sunday. The paper said the counter-rally Saturday intended to show support for the police reflected “mainstream public opinion” in Hong Kong.

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Hong Kong activists protesting Chinese traders clash with police

Violent clashes broke out after several thousand people marched in Hong Kong against traders from mainland China in what is fast becoming a summer of unrest in the semi-autonomous territory.

After issuing a warning, police on Saturday moved forward to disperse the crowd of mostly young protesters who say peaceful demonstrations have failed to bring about change.

Police used pepper spray and batons. In panicky scenes, fleeing protesters scrambled over each other, some falling to the ground. Some had donned protective masks and helmets ahead of the confrontation.

APTOPIX Hong Kong Protests
A police officer attacks protesters holding up umbrellas in Hong Kong Saturday, July 13, 2019. Several thousand people marched in Hong Kong on Saturday against traders from mainland China in what is fast becoming a summer of unrest in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory. Kin Cheung / AP

Major demonstrations in the past month against a proposal to change extradition laws that would allow Hong Kong suspects to stand trial in mainland China have reawakened other movements in the city. Thousands marched last weekend against middle-aged mainland women who sing loudly and dance somewhat provocatively in a public park.

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The protests have a common refrain: Hong Kong’s government, led by a non-democratically elected chief executive, is not addressing the people’s concerns.

Another rally is planned for Sunday.

Walking behind a banner that read “Strictly enforce the law, stop cross-border traders,” Saturday’s marchers passed by pharmacies and cosmetic shops that are popular with Chinese tourists and traders who bring goods back to sell in the mainland. Many of the stores were shuttered because of the protest.

The city’s leader, Carrie Lam, has pledged to do a better job of listening to all sectors of society, but many protesters want her to resign.

Her government proposed legislation in February that would have allowed suspects to be extradited to China. The proposal ignited concerns that the rights and freedoms guaranteed to the former British colony for 50 years after its 1997 return to China are being chipped away at by a pro-Beijing government in Hong Kong.

Lam suspended the legislation indefinitely after protesters blocked the legislature on June 12, preventing the Legislative Council from meeting to debate the extradition bill. Faced with continuing protests, she declared the bill “dead” on Tuesday, but protesters remain unsatisfied, demanding it be formally withdrawn.

The march Saturday took place in Sheung Shui, a district that lies across the border from the mainland city of Shenzhen. Organizer Ronald Leung, a leader of the North District Parallel Imports Concern Group, said residents have been complaining about the issue of Chinese traders for many years.

“Citizens are really angry,” he said. “They want to come out and show their concern over the cross-border traders problem in the area, which is never solved.”

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The Hong Kong Dollar Is On a Tear, Climbing to Two-Year High

© Bloomberg. Hong Kong one-hundred dollar banknotes are arranged for a photograph in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2016.  Photographer: Justin Chin/Bloomberg © Bloomberg. Hong Kong one-hundred dollar banknotes are arranged for a photograph in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2016. Photographer: Justin Chin/Bloomberg

(Bloomberg) — The advanced to its strongest since May 2017 as tight liquidity in the city keeps borrowing costs elevated.

The currency rose as much as 0.19% to 7.7827 versus the greenback Thursday, days after it started trading in the strong half of its band for the first time since September. The local one-month interbank rate rose 29 basis points to 2.99% — the highest in more than decade — while the overnight Hibor jumped 84 basis points to 3.14%.

Local money rates are surging as companies hoard cash to pay for dividends and large share sales lock up funds, outstripping the income a trader can expect on U.S. dollars. That’s undermining a once-popular trade to sell the Hong Kong dollar and buy the greenback that had pushed the city’s currency to the weak end of its trading band only months ago. The tighter liquidity has also coincided with recent demonstrations in Hong Kong.

“Hong Kong dollar movement comes with liquidity tightness,” said Frances Cheung, head of Asia macro strategy at Westpac Banking Corp. The liquidity situation will persist until after the second large share offering, she added.

The Asia-Pacific arm of Anheuser-Busch InBev this week started preparing for a listing that could raise as much as $ 9.8 billion, while Alibaba (NYSE:) Group Holding Ltd. is said to have filed for an IPO that could raise $ 20 billion.

The Hong Kong Monetary Authority spent HK$ 22.1 billion ($ 2.8 billion) in March to defend the currency’s peg. The peg means Kong Kong’s de facto central bank effectively imports U.S. monetary policy.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.

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Hong Kong’s government has postponed debate on the extradition bill to an unspecified time

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Massive protests in Hong Kong over Chinese extradition bill

Hong Kong — Hundreds of thousands of protesters marched through Hong Kong on Sunday to voice their opposition to government-sponsored legislation that would allow people to be extradited to mainland China to face charges. The peaceful protest turned violent early Monday morning when several hundred protesters stormed Hong Kong’s parliament and clashed with police.

According to Reuters, demonstrators charged at police lines in an attempt to enter the Legislative Council building. The police charged back, displaying tear gas guns and using pepper spray. The crowd briefly pushed its way into the lobby but police used batons and pepper spray and the protesters were moved outside. There is no confirmation yet if anyone has been killed or injured.

Hong Kong Extradition Law
Protesters against the proposed amendments to the extradition law in Hong Kong clash with police officers outside the Legislative Council in Hong Kong in the early hours of Monday, June 10, 2019.  AP

The massive demonstration took place three days before the semi-autonomous Chinese territory’s government plans to bring the highly contentious bill to the full legislature, bypassing the committee process in a bid to win approval by the end of the month. The bill has been proposed by the administration of Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam.

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The protest was one of the largest in recent Hong Kong history. It appeared to be larger than the 2014 Pro Democracy Movement protests. It also appeared to be even bigger than a massive pro-democracy demonstration in 2003 against a proposed national security law, according to Associated Press journalists who covered both events. People of all ages took part in the march, some pushing strollers and others carrying canes, chanting slogans in the native Cantonese dialect in favor of greater transparency in government.

Kiwi Wong, 27, was among the throng, a member of the younger generation who’ve grown up enjoying relative prosperity but also growing insecurity about what many see as an erosion of the rights Hong Kong residents have enjoyed.

“If I didn’t come out now, I don’t know when I would have the chance to express my opinion again,” Wong said. “Because now we’ve got to this stage, if you don’t come out to try to do what you can, then it will end up too late, you won’t be able to say or do anything about it.”

Alex Ng, a 67-year-old retiree, said he joined the protest because “I think that there was never any public consultation about this law, and there are a lot of uncertainties.”

APTOPIX Hong Kong Extradition Law
Protesters march along a downtown street against the proposed amendments to an extradition law in Hong Kong Sunday, June 9, 2019.  AP

Hong Kong’s leader, Carrie Lam, has pushed forward with the legislation despite widespread criticism from human rights and business groups. The amendments have been criticized as eroding Hong Kong’s judicial independence by making it easier to send criminal suspects to mainland China, where they could face vague national security charges and unfair trials.

The Hong Kong government said in a statement late Sunday that it respected the right of its opponents to protest.

Hong Kong was guaranteed the right to retain its own social, legal and political systems for 50 years following its handover from British to Chinese rule in 1997, the so-called “one country, two systems” framework. However, China’s ruling Communist Party has been seen as increasingly reneging on that agreement by forcing through unpopular legal changes.

Hong Kong currently limits extraditions to jurisdictions with which it has existing extradition agreements or to others on an individual basis under a law passed before 1997.

China was excluded because of concerns over its poor record on legal independence and human rights. In recent years, mainland authorities have gone after opponents by accusing them of dubious crimes such as tax evasion and crystallizing worries among critics.

Lam’s government argued that the revisions were needed to close legal loopholes, while opponents say that is merely an excuse to pursue China’s agenda of reducing Hong Kong’s legal independence. Hong Kong’s Legislative Council plans to vote on the bill Wednesday.

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Hong Kong Dollar Nears Weak End of Peg as Trade War Costs Mount

© Reuters.  Hong Kong Dollar Nears Weak End of Peg as Trade War Costs Mount © Reuters. Hong Kong Dollar Nears Weak End of Peg as Trade War Costs Mount

(Bloomberg) — Hong Kong’s currency is once again approaching the weak end of its trading band against the greenback, after a reprieve last month.

Falling demand for Hong Kong assets amid an escalation of tensions between China and the U.S. is weighing on the currency, and the gap between city’s and U.S. borrowing costs has widened after narrowing in April. This makes the local dollar more appealing to short.

Further weakness will likely prompt the Hong Kong Monetary Authority to resume interventions, after spending HK$ 22.1 billion ($ 2.8 billion) defending the currency in March. That would reduce interbank liquidity at a time when the local economy is struggling as a fragile global outlook and the trade war damps activity.

The traded little changed at 7.8494 to the greenback at 1 p.m. local time, close to the 7.85 end of its band, after rising to as high as 7.8305 in April.

The has retreated almost 5 percent in May. The gap between the borrowing costs on the Hong Kong dollar and the greenback has widened to about 70 basis points after falling to 34 in mid-April. A wider spread spurs traders to sell the local currency and put the proceeds in the higher-yielding greenback.

The weaker stock market will add downward pressure on Hibor, helping to widen the spread with Libor and increasing pressure on the Hong Kong dollar, said Samuel Tse, an economist at DBS Bank Ltd. in Hong Kong.

“If stock market weakness is sustained, that means the Hong Kong dollar will depreciate further and that will trigger HKMA intervention,” he said.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.

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