Russian Billionaire Loses Lawsuit Against Nordic Banks

© Reuters.  Russian Billionaire Loses Lawsuit Against Nordic Banks © Reuters. Russian Billionaire Loses Lawsuit Against Nordic Banks

(Bloomberg) — A group of Nordic banks sued by a Russian oligarch aren’t required to accept his business, according to what may prove to be a landmark ruling by a court in Finland.

Russian billionaire Boris Rotenberg, an associate of President Vladimir Putin, lost his lawsuit against four Nordic banks and was ordered to pay more than 500,000 euros ($ 556,000) to cover their legal fees, the Helsinki District Court ruled on Monday.

The court said that forcing the banks to accept business from Rotenberg, who is on the U.S. sanctions list, would have subjected them to significant financial risk which they, by law, are prohibited from taking.

The lawsuit targeted Svenska Handelsbanken AB (ST:) for refusing to accept cross-border deposits from Rotenberg, and Nordea Bank Abp (SIX:), OP Group and Danske Bank A/S (CSE:) for not processing payments to vendors for basics including Rotenberg’s electricity bills.

Jakob Dedenroth Bernhoft, a Copenhagen-based lawyer who specializes in compliance and money laundering issues, said the decision would set an important precedent.

“All the other banks will look at this decision from the court for guidance on what to do in a similar situation,” Bernhoft said by phone before the verdict was delivered.

At stake was the banks’ access to the U.S. dollar market, which is crucial to their ability to operate.

The case comes against a backdrop of money-laundering scandals in the region, with regulators ratcheting up compliance requirements. Banks are also under increasing pressure to identify dodgy customers. According to documents provided to the court, Rotenberg has a current account at Handelsbanken, which the bank has supplied on the recommendation of the Finnish Financial Ombudsman Bureau.

Rotenberg had argued that his status as a dual citizen of both Russia and Finland meant that banks based in Europe must process his transactions. But the court said Rotenberg failed to prove he resides in a European Economic Area country, and thus has no such rights to basic banking services as mandated by law.

The court’s panel of judges ruled unanimously, but the verdict can be appealed. Rotenberg has seven days to express his dissatisfaction with the ruling, the court said.

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Russian F1 organizers say race stays despite WADA sanctions

© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: Formula One F1 - Russian Grand Prix © Reuters. FILE PHOTO: Formula One F1 – Russian Grand Prix

MOSCOW (Reuters) – Russia’s Formula One Grand Prix in Sochi will not be affected by the country’s four-year World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) ban for tampering with doping tests, the race’s promoters said on Monday.

The sanctions include a four-year ban on Russia hosting major sporting events. [nL8N28J2DU]

Formula One’s governing body, the International Automobile Federation (FIA) is International Olympic Committee-recognised and classified by WADA as a code signatory.

“The contract for holding the Russian round of the Formula One World Championship was signed in 2010, long before the events investigated by WADA, and runs until 2025,” promoters ROSGONKI said in a statement.

They pointed out that the race was entered on next year’s calendar and said it would be “legally and technically impossible” to re-assign it elsewhere.

“We are confident that the Formula One Russian Grand Prix will be held in 2020 and in the following years and invite everyone to Sochi — the ticket sales are in full swing,” the statement added.

The race has been held since 2014 against a backdrop of Sochi’s Winter Olympic facilities — Games now notorious for state-sponsored doping cover-ups.

Russia has been embroiled in doping scandals since a 2015 report commissioned by WADA found evidence of mass doping in Russian athletics.

The WADA executive committee acted on Monday after concluding that Moscow had planted fake evidence and deleted files linked to positive doping tests in laboratory data that could have helped identify drug cheats.

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Frozen 18,000-year-old puppy discovered in Russian permafrost

Russian scientists on Monday unveiled a prehistoric puppy, believed to be 18,000 years old, that was found in permafrost in the country’s Far East. Discovered last year in a lump of frozen mud near the city of Yakutsk, the puppy is unusually well-preserved.

“This puppy has all its limbs, pelage – fur, even whiskers. The nose is visible. There are teeth. We can determine due to some data that it is a male,” Nikolai Androsov, director of the Northern World private museum where the remains are stored, said at the presentation at the Yakutsk’s Mammoth Museum.

The pup was dubbed “Dogor,” a Yakutian word for friend. It appears to have died when it was two months old.

Trending News

In recent years, Russia’s Far East has been plentiful for scientists studying the remains of ancient animals. As the permafrost melts, more and more parts of woolly mammoths, canines and other prehistoric animals are being discovered. Often it is mammoth tusk hunters who discover them.

w6odpaavaii6vagw2dfhabzhh4.jpg
This is a handout photo taken on Monday, September 24, 2018, showing a 18,000-year-old Puppy found in permafrost in the Russia’s Far East, on display at the Yakutsk’s Mammoth Museum, Russia. Russian scientists have presented a unique prehistoric canine, believed to be 18,000 years old and found in permafrost in the Russia’s Far East, to the public on Monday, December 2, 2019. Sergei Fyodorov/Yakutsk Mammoth Museum/AP

When the puppy was discovered, scientists from the Stockholm-based Center for Palaeogenetics took a piece of bone to study its DNA.

“The first step was of course to send the sample to radio carbon dating to see how old it was and when we got the results back it turned out that it was roughly 18,000 years old,” Love Dalén, professor of evolutionary genetics at the center, said in an online interview.

Further tests, however, left the scientists with more questions than answers — they couldn’t definitively tell whether it was a dog or a wolf.

“We have now generated a nearly complete genome sequence from it and normally when you have a two-fold coverage genome, which is what we have, you should be able to relatively easily say whether it’s a dog or a wolf, but we still can’t say and that makes it even more interesting,” Dalén said.

He added that the scientists are about to do a third round of genome sequencing, which might solve the mystery.

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Russian police detain prominent opposition activist before protest

© Reuters. Rally calling for opposition candidates to be registered for elections to Moscow City Duma in Moscow © Reuters. Rally calling for opposition candidates to be registered for elections to Moscow City Duma in Moscow

By Andrew Osborn and Maria Tsvetkova

MOSCOW (Reuters) – Russian police forcibly detained over 800 people attending a protest in Moscow on Saturday to demand free elections, including prominent activist Lyubov Sobol, after authorities warned the demonstration was illegal.

Police removed Sobol from a taxi and bundled her into a van minutes before the start of what anti-Kremlin activists described as a peaceful walk to protest against the exclusion of their candidates from an election next month.

Soon after the start of the protest, a Reuters reporter saw several hundred people milling around at one of the designated protest points in central Moscow. Minutes later, a line of riot police began to squeeze people out of the area.

OVD-Info, an independent monitoring group, said police had detained 828 people, in some cases beating them with truncheons as they lay on the floor. Reuters reporters witnessed dozens of arrests. In one case police carried off a man as he clung upside down to his bicycle.

Police said they had detained 600 and said 1,500 had attended the protest, though footage of demonstrations which flared in different parts of Moscow suggested many more had taken part.

Saturday’s protest was smaller than one a week earlier, but underlined the determination of some Kremlin critics — especially younger people — to keep pressing to open up Russia’s tightly-choreographed political system.

The focus of protesters’ anger is a prohibition on a number of opposition-minded candidates, some of whom are allies of jailed opposition politician Alexei Navalny, from taking part in a September election for Moscow’s city legislature.

That vote, though local, is seen as a dry run for a national parliamentary election in 2021.

Authorities say opposition candidates failed to collect enough genuine signatures to register. The excluded candidates say that is a lie and insist on taking part in a contest they believe they could win.

“They (the authorities) are wiping their feet on us,” said Elena, a student attending Saturday’s protest.

Another attendee, Yevgeny Snetkov, a 61-year-old engineer, described as brazen the way the authorities had prevented opposition candidates from running. “I had no option left but to protest,” he said.

Some protesters chanted “Putin is a thief” as they marched.

INTERNATIONAL CONDEMNATION

Observers said the police presence was one of the biggest at such a protest in nearly a decade. Mobile internet access was cut in some areas and police cordoned off swathes of central Moscow to stop people gathering.

At a similar protest a week earlier, police detained more than 1,300 in one of the biggest security operations of recent years that brought wide international condemnation.

Authorities carried out a new round of detentions and home searches before Saturday’s protest and opened criminal proceedings for what they term mass civil unrest, an offence which carries a penalty of up to 15 years in jail.

Activists say the Russian constitution allows them to freely protest. But authorities say they need to agree the timing and location of any demonstrations in advance, something that was not done ahead of Saturday’s protest.

Opposition activists say the authorities have repeatedly refused to allow protests in central Moscow, leaving them with no choice but to go ahead anyway.

At least eight of Sobol’s allies, including Navalny, are in jail for breaking tough protest laws. The ruling United Russia dominates the national parliament and Navalny plus his allies are starved of media air-time.

Russian investigators said on Saturday they had opened a criminal investigation into the alleged laundering of 1 billion rubles ($ 15.3 million) by an anti-corruption foundation which Navalny set up. Navalny and his allies say the foundation is transparently financed from public donations.

President Vladimir Putin and the Kremlin have not commented on the standoff with the opposition, but Moscow prosecutors on Friday warned would-be protesters that Saturday’s demonstration had not been approved and its organizers could be brought to account.

At well over 60 percent, Putin’s approval rating is still high compared with many other world leaders, but is lower than it used to be due to discontent over years of falling incomes.

Last year the 66-year-old former KGB intelligence officer won a landslide re-election and a new six-year term until 2024.

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Expert: Russian interference in 2016 was “perfect attack” against U.S.

Veteran FBI counterintelligence operative Eric O’Neill said that Russian interference in the 2016 election was a “perfect attack,” calling it “one of the most successful espionage attacks on the United States that I can remember.”

O’Neill is known for his role in the arrest and conviction of FBI agent Robert Hanssen, a mole who was spying on behalf of the Soviet Union and then Russia. O’Neill spoke with CBS News Chief Washington Correspondent Major Garrett for this week’s episode of “The Takeout” podcast.

“Russia’s motives are and always have been to cause problems here in the United States, to turn us against each other,” O’Neill said. “If we’re divided as a country here, we are not projecting our force, our democracy, our values, our democracy across the world, and that gives Russia space to grow. That gives Putin space to push his version of what the world should look like across the world.”

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O’Neill said that while he didn’t know if the Russian attack was “designed” to help President Trump, that the goal was to “cause as much disruption and chaos” as possible, and Mr. Trump’s victory was “like a bonus.”

However, he warned that Russia was likely to attempt to interfere in the 2020 election again.

“They are going to come at us hard in 2020,” O’Neill said.

In his conversation with Garrett, O’Neill also gave the details of his role in the takedown of Hanssen. O’Neill’s book on the matter, “Gray Day,” was released in the spring.

For more of Major’s wide-ranging conversation with Eric O’Neill, download “The Takeout” podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify. New episodes are available every Friday morning. Also, you can watch “The Takeout” on CBSN Friday at 5pm, 9pm, and 12am ET and Saturday at 1pm, 9pm, and 12am ET. For a full archive of “The Takeout” episodes, visit www.takeoutpodcast.com. And you can listen to “The Takeout” on select CBS News Radio affiliates (check your local listings).

Producers: Arden Farhi, Katiana Krawchenko, Jamie Benson and Sara Cook
CBSN Production: Alex Zuckerman, Eric Soussanin and Grace Segers
Show email: TakeoutPodcast@cbsnews.com
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Facebook: Facebook.com/TakeoutPodcast 

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Facebook: Nick Clegg says ‘no evidence’ of Russian interference in Brexit vote

There is “absolutely no evidence” Russia influenced the Brexit result using Facebook, the company’s vice-president, Sir Nick Clegg, has said.

The former deputy PM told the BBC the company had carried out analyses of its data and found no “significant attempt” by outside forces to sway the vote.

Instead, he argued that “the roots to British euroscepticism go very deep”.

In a wide-ranging interview, Sir Nick also called for more regulation of Facebook and other tech giants.

Sir Nick, the former leader of the Liberal Democrats and deputy prime minister during the coalition government, was hired by Facebook in October last year.

In an interview with BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, he said Facebook was now arguing for greater regulation of tech firms.

He said there was a “pressing need” for new “rules of the road” on privacy, election rules, the use of people’s data and adjudicating on what constitutes hate speech.

It follows growing criticism of the tech giant and calls from MPs for far stricter regulation over issues including fake news, harmful content and the way user data is used.

Asked whether Facebook should not be fixing some of these issues itself, Sir Nick said it was not something big tech companies “can or should” do on their own.

“It’s not for private companies, however big or small, to come up with those rules. It is for democratic politicians in the democratic world to do so,” he said.

But he stressed companies like Facebook should play a “mature role” in advocating – rather than shunning – regulation.

‘Conspiracy’

In the interview, Sir Nick dismissed claims that data analytics firm Cambridge Analytica influenced people’s decision to vote Leave in the EU referendum in 2016.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

“Much though I understand why people want to sort of reduce that eruption in British politics to some kind of plot or conspiracy – or some use of new social media through opaque means – I’m afraid the roots to British Euroscepticism go very, very deep,” he said.

Instead, he argued attitudes had been influenced far more by “traditional media” over the last 40 years than by new media.

The scandal around the way data was used by Cambridge Analytica was first exposed by Carole Cadwalladr, an investigative journalist at the Guardian newspaper.

Christchurch attack video

Sir Nick also claimed the company was getting better at removing harmful content, saying it was a “matter of minutes” before the first video of the Christchurch mosque shooting was removed.

A video of March’s attack, in which 51 people were killed, was livestreamed on Facebook.

The issue, he said, was the huge numbers of people reposting that initial video afterwards, including the mainstream media.

“In the case of Facebook, I think 200 people saw the video as it was being livestreamed,” he said.

But in the 24 hours following the shooting, Sir Nick said Facebook took down 1.5 million versions of the video. He said about 1.3 million of those were removed before they were reported.

Self-harm images

Sir Nick was also asked about how well Instagram – which is owned by Facebook – was responding to images of self-harm on the platform.

After 14-year-old Molly Russell took her own life in 2017, her family found distressing material about depression and suicide on her Instagram feed.

Sir Nick said Instagram had spent a lot of time with experts on teenage mental health and had been told it was “important to allow youngsters to express their anguish”, including allowing them to post images of self-harm.

“We have now shifted things dramatically. We take down all forms of graphic content. The images that are still available on Instagram have a sort of filter, if you like, so they can’t be clearly seen,” he said.

On wider attitudes towards the sector, Sir Nick said there had been a shift in recent years from “tech utopia” – where people like Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg “could do no wrong” – to a culture of “tech phobia”.

But he cautioned against any excessive backlash against technology: “I think we end up with the risk that we throw the baby out with the bathwater and make it almost impossible for tech to innovate properly.”

“Technology is not good or bad,” he said. “Technology down the ages is used by good and bad people for good and bad ends.”

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Manchin: Russian activity in Arctic at highest level since Cold War

Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia issued a stark warning about the geopolitical threat of Russia’s presence in the Arctic, saying Moscow’s military and economic activity in the region is at the highest level since the Cold War. 

“It’s unbelievable the commitment they’ve made,” Manchin said on “Face the Nation” Sunday. “We’ve seen more activity of aircraft flying in those spaces. We’ve seen submarine activity from Russia, more so than we have during the Cold War.”

Despite not seeing any evidence of the Kremlin conducting low-yield nuclear tests in the Arctic — as the Trump administration has suggested — during a recent visit to the region with other lawmakers, the West Virginia Democrat said Russia is undoubtedly expanding its military role in its northernmost territory, home to the largest communities inside the Arctic Circle in the world. 

Last week, the director of the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency indicated in a speech that Moscow was likely staging low-yield nuclear testing at sites in Novaya Zemlya, an island chain in the Arctic Ocean. The claim by one of the highest-ranking intelligence officials in the country represented the first time the U.S. formally — and publicly — accused the Russian government of breaching the parameters set forth by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty.  

Manchin said the expansion he witnessed during his trip is a “game changer” which warrants a U.S. response in the form of more investment and involvement in the Arctic. 

“We have got to be on top and the United States has got to start getting involved to make sure that we’re a leader up there and not a follower,” he said, adding later, “We should be alerted and we should start acting.”

© 2019 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Russian court puts ex-shareholder of Yugra Bank under house arrest

Russian court puts ex-shareholder of Yugra Bank under house arrest Russian court puts ex-shareholder of Yugra Bank under house arrest

MOSCOW (Reuters) – A Russian court said on Friday it had ruled that a former shareholder of Yugra Bank should be held under house arrest until June 18.

Alexei Khotin was detained earlier on Friday on suspicion of embezzling 7.5 billion rubles ($ 117 million) from Yugra Bank, whose license was withdrawn by the Russian Central Bank in 2017.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.

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Russian region declares emergency over polar bear “invasion”

novaya-zemlya-russia-polar-bears.jpg
A photo posted to Instagram on Feb. 10, 2019 by user @muah_irinaelis (Irina Elis)in the remote town of Belushya Guba, on Russia’s Novaya Zemlya peninsula, shows a group of polar bears looking for food. The region declared a state of emergency over a “mass invasion” of polar bears.  Instagram/Irina Elis

A Russian Arctic archipelago on Saturday declared an emergency situation over an “invasion” of dozens of aggressive polar bears that have entered homes and public buildings. Russia’s northeastern Novaya Zemlya archipelago, which has a population of around 3,000 people, has appealed for help to tackle “a mass invasion of polar bears into inhabited areas,” regional authorities said in a statement.

Russian authorities have so far refused permission to shoot the bears but are sending a commission to investigate the situation and have not ruled out a cull.

Polar bears are affected by global warming with melting Arctic ice forcing them to spend more time on land where they compete for food. Scientists have long warned that the shrinking sea ice in the Arctic poses a direct threat to the bears, and increases the likelihood of encounters with humans.

Polar bears are recognized as an endangered species in Russia and hunting them is banned.

New study shows climate change is affecting polar bears’ weight

Russia has air force and air defence troops based on Novaya Zemlya.

Since December, 52 polar bears have regularly visited the archipelago’s main settlement, Belushya Guba, with some displaying “aggressive behavior,” local official Alexander Minayev said in a report to regional authorities.

This included “attacks on people and entering residential homes and public buildings,” said Minayev, the deputy chief of the local administration.

“There are constantly 6 to 10 bears inside the settlement,” he said.

“People are scared, they are afraid to leave their homes… parents are frightened to let their children go to schools and kindergartens.”

The head of the local administration Zhigansha Musin said that the numbers of polar bears were unprecedented.

“I’ve been on Novaya Zemlya since 1983 and there’s never been such a mass invasion of polar bears,” he told regional officials.

Some residents of Belushya Guba took to social media to show their own video and photos of the bears, and express their shock.

Bears are constantly inside a military garrison and “literally chase people” he said as well as going into the entrances of apartment buildings.

Local officials complained that measures to scare off polar bears such as vehicle and dog patrols have not been effective as polar bears feel secure and no longer react.

The federal environmental resources agency has refused to issue licences to shoot the most aggressive bears.

A working group of regional and federal officials is set to visit the archipelago to assess the situation and the measures taken so far.

The Arkhangelsk regional authorities, which oversee Novaya Zemlya, said that if all else failed “shooting the animals could be the only possible forced measure.”

In January, a defence ministry official said that hundreds of disused military buildings had been demolished on Novaya Zemlya because polar bears were settling inside them.

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WADA poised to decide fate of Russian agency

© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: A woman walks into the head offices of WADA in Montreal © Reuters. FILE PHOTO: A woman walks into the head offices of WADA in Montreal

By Steve Keating

TORONTO (Reuters) – A long-running doping scandal could be heading towards a conclusion when the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) receives a report from their Compliance Review Committee (CRC) next week that could confirm Russia’s conditional reinstatement.

Having, after much stalling, allowed a WADA inspection team access to data in a tainted Moscow laboratory on Thursday, Russian authorities will no doubt say they have met the final demand laid out in a Roadmap to Compliance and call for the conditional status of the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) to be lifted.

The CRC will meet members of the inspection teams at WADA’s Montreal headquarters on Monday and Tuesday then submit a report to the executive committee recommending whether RUSADA be declared compliant or be slapped with new sanctions.

Tensions and suspicions are running high after a WADA inspection team was prevented from retrieving the data last month when Russian authorities said the equipment being used was not certified under Russian law.

Access to the data before a Dec. 31 deadline had been a condition of WADA’s September decision to provisionally reinstate RUSADA.

A second WADA inspection team went to Moscow and began retrieving data on Thursday but some athletes’ groups and anti-doping organizations have expressed concern over whether all the material would be handed over and whether it had been tampered with.

Once WADA is in possession of the data Russian authorities must also ensure that any re-analysis of samples is completed by June 30 this year.

Under increasing pressure to act swiftly and decisively, WADA said on Saturday that it would make the report available to the executive committee no later than Thursday and announce a ruling on Jan. 22.

If RUSADA is found non-compliant and WADA imposes new sanctions, Russian authorities can appeal against the decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), prolonging what is already one of the longest-running doping scandals.

RUSADA was suspended in 2015 after a WADA-commissioned report by Canadian lawyer Dick Pound outlined evidence of state-backed, systematic doping in Russian athletics, allegations Moscow has denied.

A second commission led by another Canadian sports lawyer, Richard McLaren, in 2016 uncovered more evidence of an elaborate state-sponsored doping scheme across many sports triggering outrage from clean athletes and anti-doping groups that led to Russian athletes being banned from two Olympics, whistleblowers living in hiding and millions of dollars being spent on investigations.

The doping crisis has created chaos across the sporting world with athletes demanding action and reform.

Anti-doping hardliners such as United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) chief Travis Tygart have demanded that Russia remains suspended until the data can be confirmed and samples retested while International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Thomas Bach has not waited for the WADA ruling, recently declaring that Russia had paid its debt to the international sporting community.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.

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