Apple’s iPhone 11 Pro and ‘always-on’ Watch unveiled

Apple has unveiled its iPhone 11 range of handsets, which feature more cameras than before and a processor that has been updated to be faster while consuming less power.

The company said the two Pro models would last between four to five hours longer than their XS predecessors.

But it did not launch a 5G model, and some rumoured features were missing.

Apple also revealed a new version of its smartwatch, which features an “always on” display for the first time.

The Series 5 Watch adjusts how often it refreshes the screen to as little as one frame per second to promise the same 18-hour battery life as the previous version.

It also introduces a compass as well as the option of a titanium case. Its new operating system will alert owners to when nearby noise rises to risky levels, and adds menstrual cycle-tracking.

“I love strategically where Apple is going with its health and safety capabilities, but was disappointed to not see a sleep study or feature mentioned,” commented analyst Patrick Moorhead.

The company added that it will keep its Series 3 model on the market, which will cost $ 199 – or £199 in the UK – marking a new entry price point for the wearable.

Apple currently accounts for 49% of the global smartwatch market, according to research firm IDC.

It is also the UK’s top-selling smartphone brand by a wide margin.

Camera features

The new iPhones are notable for introducing an “ultrawide” rear camera, offering 2x optical zoom-out.

The Pro models retain the telephoto and normal lenses found in the last generation’s XS and XS Max, while the basic iPhone 11 only has an ultrawide and standard lens.

Apple made a virtue of a new Night Mode, which automatically brightens the image when required while taking steps to minimise the digital noise produced as a result. Google, Samsung and Huawei had already introduced a similar feature to their handsets.

A new facility called Deep Fusion was also teased. It takes nine snaps with a variety of exposures and then picks through them “pixel by pixel” to combine the best parts from each to create a superior image. This will not, however, be available at launch but should be added via a software update before the year’s end.

Other enhancements include the ability to shoot slow-motion videos with the front camera.

The handsets’ processor – the A13 Bionic – has also been upgraded.

Apple claims its CPU (central processing unit) and GPU (graphics processing unit) are more powerful than those featured in any Android phone.

In addition, the chip’s “neural engine” has been optimised to better handle matrix calculations – a type of algebra used by neural networks – and is said to be 20% faster than the A12.

However, the new models are not compatible with Apple’s Pencil stylus, as had been expected by many. That feature was already offered by its lowest-end iPad.

Nor can they wirelessly recharge other devices, unlike Samsung and Huawei’s premium phones.

The handsets also stick with having lightning ports rather than making the shift to USB-C, as has happened with the iPad Pro – which could have made faster data transfers possible.

The iPhone 11 is slightly cheaper than its XR forerunner in the UK, ranging between £729 and £879 depending on the amount of storage.

But the Pro models are more expensive than the XS ones, costing between £1,049 and £1,499.

They go on sale in 10 days time.

Slowing demand

Apple experienced a bigger global drop in demand for new handsets than many of its rivals last year.

But the firm recently reported that its active install base – the number of iPhones in use – was at an “all time high”.

Smartphone shipments

“Several forces play here,” commented Marta Pinto from IDC.

“Apple designs devices that last longer than an average Android device, and it’s been very good at rolling out new versions of its operating system.

“There’s also a very good second-hand trade in iPhones, and the overall smartphone market is slowing down.

“But Apple doesn’t mind because its focus is now turning to services, and its wearables are also doing well.”

The new iPhone line-up does not feature a 5G model, in part because Intel struggled to develop the required modem.

At a time when consumers are holding onto their handsets for longer before upgrading, that could place a further constraint on sales – especially in countries where 5G networks have already launched, such as the UK.

“Given people’s loyalty to iPhone, if they really want 5G they’ll probably just wait,” said Ben Wood from the consultancy CCS Insight.

“That said, don’t be surprised to see rivals, particularly Samsung, positioning 5G devices as ‘future-proof’ options.

“I’m sure they will be arguing that buying a premium priced 4G smartphone right now would be like buying a TV a few years ago that was not HD-Ready.”

Subscription services

Earlier at the event, Tim Cook revealed that its two forthcoming subscription services would each cost $ 4.99 – or £4.99 in the UK – per month.

Apple Arcade – a video games deal offering exclusive access to games that do not feature in-app fees – will become available on 19 September.

It will be followed by Apple TV+ – a television programme and movie-streaming platform with content not available elsewhere – which will make its first shows available on 1 November.

The latter will be cheaper than rival services from Disney and Netflix, but appears to promise less material at this stage.

“I applaud web access to Apple TV+, but would have preferred an Android and Windows app,” commented Mr Moorhead.

There was no mention of Apple bundling the new services with its existing cloud storage, news and music offerings for a discount, as had been speculated.

But it will offer one year’s membership to Apple TV+ to consumers buying one of its computers or set-top boxes.

In addition, the company unveiled a new iPad.

The seventh generation model has a 10.2in (25.9cm) screen – making it bigger than before – and will go on sale at the end of the month.

It will start at £349, a £30 increase on the earlier model.

It has now been nearly 13 years since Steve Jobs unveiled the first iPhone.

Apple has since become one of the world’s most valuable companies, in part because of investors’ hopes that it can pull off a similar trick.

“Everyone wants Apple to have a new ‘wow’ product and its got a pretty good track record,” commented Mr Wood.

“But the next big hit is proving elusive right now. My money is still on smart glasses but I think it could still be years before we see anything.”

These updates are less about bringing in new features, but enhancing the things we’re already familiar with.

The iPhone Pro’s camera setup is being aimed at – as you might guess – professionals. I think Apple sees big potential in indie filmmakers and documentary-makers. The battery-life bump should also help.

Apple TV+ is cheap compared to its competitors. But is it good value?

Disney+, Netflix, HBO et al have huge back catalogues of loved TV shows and movies. Apple doesn’t, or at least it’s not clear what it will have, even one year from now.

All Apple really has is a boatload of cash to fill up Apple TV+ with content it hopes people will like. We’ve seen no evidence, yet, that it’s capable of fulfilling that goal.

Giving one year’s access away with new devices is a way of making sure those new shows have wide exposure – but it needs to convince the entertainment industry that it’s worth making a show for Apple+ instead of its rivals.

How phone cameras evolved:

Kyocera VP-210 VisualPhone (1999)

Although there is some dispute over which mobile first featured a built-in colour camera, many credit this handset as having the honour. It featured a 0.11 megapixel (MP) sensor and could only store 20 selfies, but was able to transmit a jerky video feed in real-time at about two frames per second.

Sharp J-SH04 (2000)

Sharp’s first photo-snapping mobile placed its sensor on the rear of its handset to encourage its use as an alternative to standard cameras. Its 0.11MP snaps could then be sent to friends via email.

Sony Ericsson T68i (2002)

The handset’s optional CommuniCam MCA-20 accessory snapped on to the bottom of the handset, helping keep down the phone’s size when not in use. It was limited to taking VGA (0.3MP) resolution shots, but the images could be texted to others via MMS (Multimedia Messaging Service) if they had compatible phones.

Samsung D500 (2004)

This was one of the first handsets to offer more than one megapixel of image quality. What’s more it had a flash. Meanwhile the software made it possible to add graphical frames around photos and turn images sepia or apply a “negative” effect.

Nokia N90 (2005)

Nokia’s N90 had a somewhat clunky swivel design, but a two megapixel sensor and a lens developed in collaboration with the famed German optics firm Carl Zeiss pitched it firmly at camera enthusiasts.

Samsung G800 (2007)

The megapixel wars were well under way by the time Samsung unveiled the G800. It took 5MP shots, had a 3x optical zoom and even featured a lens-cover slider, meaning that from the rear it could be easily mistaken for a dedicated camera.

iPhone 4 (2010)

Apple’s fourth-generation iPhone is widely credited with helping kickstart the selfie craze, despite being far from the first to have a front camera. But at its launch, Steve Jobs was keener to show off how the feature could be used for Facetime, the firm’s video chat app.

LG Optimus 3D (2011)

Smartphones with two rear cameras were still a rarity when LG’s Android phone went on sale. It used them to create 3D images that could be viewed without special glasses on its display. But 3D phones proved to be as unpopular as 3D TVs, marking an evolutionary dead end for the industry.

HTC One (2013)

HTC’s 2013 flagship sought to shift the battle to low-light photography. To do this it made the pixels larger than normal to gather more light, and dubbed them “ultrapixels”. The trade-off was that its photos were limited to 4MP.

Nokia Lumia 1020 (2014)

This Windows Phone featured an industry-leading 41MP sensor attached to an optical image stabilisation system. It allowed users to zoom in and crop without worrying about images becoming blurred, or to combine the data to make 5MP photos with less visual noise than would otherwise be the case.

Lenovo Phab2Pro (2016)

This was the first handset to build in Google’s doomed Project Tango depth and motion-sensing cameras. They made augmented reality features possible, such as superimposing graphical images of furniture into views of a room. Tango was short-lived, but AR has lived on by other means.

Samsung Note 8 (2017)

This was one of the first phones to feature “live focus” – a facility that allowed users to adjust background blur in their photos before or after taking them. It achieved this by comparing the view from each of its two rear cameras to create a depth map of the scene.

iPhone X (2017)

Apple’s tenth anniversary handset introduced its Face ID camera system, which used tens of thousands of infrared dots to map the user’s features. As a consequence, the display had to make space for a “notch”, which was widely copied by rivals even if they didn’t feature such an elaborate facial recognition system.

Pixel 2 (2017)

Google found a way to let users blur the background of their photos using a single camera in its second-generation Pixel. This made it possible to offer the effect from both its front-facing selfie camera as well as the rear sensor.

Huawei P20 Pro (2018)

The Chinese firm’s phone was one of the first to feature three cameras on its back. But the standout feature was its ability to produce quality snaps in near-dark conditions by taking long-exposure snaps and then using machine learning software to keep the details crisp.

Oppo Reno 10x Zoom (2019)

This had two unusual camera features. Firstly, one of the rear cameras has a periscope design that directs light sideways into the device’s body, making it possible to let users zoom into a shot more than usual without sacrificing detail. Secondly, the selfie camera pops up from the top, making more space for the display.

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Video: What to watch for in the non-farm payrolls report and why CAD could rally

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ADVISORY WARNING: FOREXLIVE™ provides references and links to selected blogs and other sources of economic and market information as an educational service to its clients and prospects and does not endorse the opinions or recommendations of the blogs or other sources of information. Clients and prospects are advised to carefully consider the opinions and analysis offered in the blogs or other information sources in the context of the client or prospect’s individual analysis and decision making. None of the blogs or other sources of information is to be considered as constituting a track record. Past performance is no guarantee of future results and FOREXLIVE™ specifically advises clients and prospects to carefully review all claims and representations made by advisors, bloggers, money managers and system vendors before investing any funds or opening an account with any Forex dealer. Any news, opinions, research, data, or other information contained within this website is provided as general market commentary and does not constitute investment or trading advice. FOREXLIVE™ expressly disclaims any liability for any lost principal or profits without limitation which may arise directly or indirectly from the use of or reliance on such information. As with all such advisory services, past results are never a guarantee of future results.

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Watch out for negative shocks in the euro – MUFG

The euro held 1.12 this week but the ECB looms

MUFG Research discusses EUR/USD outlook and warns that the pair is still vulnerable to negative shocks despite its recent stabilization ahead of this week’s ECB meeting on Thursday. 

“The euro has staged a modest rebound at the start of this week after failing again to break below key support at the 1.1200-level. It may reflect some lightening of short speculative euro positions which in recent weeks have reached their highest levels since December 2016. On that occasion the euro was in the process of bottoming out against the US dollar at just below the 1.0500-level,” MUFG notes. 

“Fresh negative shocks could be required to materially weaken the euro. The most immediate is the risk of a “No Deal” Brexit at the end of this week. The current low level of implied euro volatility signals that market participants see little risk of a “No Deal” Brexit shock this week….

The potential for a further escalation in trade tensions between the EU and US could also provide negative shock for the euro. The news on that front has been unfavourable overnight after it was reported that the US is weighing imposing fresh tariffs on USD11 billion of imports from the EU including on civilian aircraft and agricultural goods,” MUFG adds.

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Video: Brexit, the Canadian debt myth and the pair to watch right now

HIGH RISK WARNING: Foreign exchange trading carries a high level of risk that may not be suitable for all investors. Leverage creates additional risk and loss exposure. Before you decide to trade foreign exchange, carefully consider your investment objectives, experience level, and risk tolerance. You could lose some or all of your initial investment; do not invest money that you cannot afford to lose. Educate yourself on the risks associated with foreign exchange trading, and seek advice from an independent financial or tax advisor if you have any questions.

ADVISORY WARNING: FOREXLIVE™ provides references and links to selected blogs and other sources of economic and market information as an educational service to its clients and prospects and does not endorse the opinions or recommendations of the blogs or other sources of information. Clients and prospects are advised to carefully consider the opinions and analysis offered in the blogs or other information sources in the context of the client or prospect’s individual analysis and decision making. None of the blogs or other sources of information is to be considered as constituting a track record. Past performance is no guarantee of future results and FOREXLIVE™ specifically advises clients and prospects to carefully review all claims and representations made by advisors, bloggers, money managers and system vendors before investing any funds or opening an account with any Forex dealer. Any news, opinions, research, data, or other information contained within this website is provided as general market commentary and does not constitute investment or trading advice. FOREXLIVE™ expressly disclaims any liability for any lost principal or profits without limitation which may arise directly or indirectly from the use of or reliance on such information. As with all such advisory services, past results are never a guarantee of future results.

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Day Ahead: Top 3 Things to Watch

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Investing.com – Here’s a preview of the top 3 things that could rock markets tomorrow.

1. How Badly Are European Economies Weakening?

Germany will offer a clue to European economic strength when it releases revised data at 8 AM German time (07:00 GMT) on fourth-quarter gross domestic product. The from economists surveyed by Investing.com is that the German economy remained flat in the quarter, the same as the earlier estimate.

As important is the 10 AM German time (09:00 GMT) German IFO Business Climate Index. The last five reports have shown the index declining. The of economists surveyed by Investing.com is for the index to fall slightly to 99 from 99.1.

The European Union will release a report revising its consumer price index at 10:00 GMT. The forecast is for a 1.1% gain, unchanged from a Feb. 1 estimate.

Lastly, European Central Bank President Mario Draghi is scheduled to speak while receiving an honorary degree at the University of Bologna in Italy. The speech is at 10:30 AM Italian time (09:30 GMT).

European economies have been struggling over the last year because of worries about Brexit and slowing economic growth overall.

2. Federal Reserve Officials Set to Speak

Many members of the Federal Open Market Committee, the Fed’s rate-making body, will speak on Friday.

The two most important speeches are likely to be:

– Vice Chairman at 12:00 PM ET (17:00 GMT) on “The Federal Reserve’s Review of Monetary Policy Strategies, Tools, and Communications,” at the U.S. Monetary Policy Forum in New York.

– , the Fed’s Vice Chairman for Supervision, on “The Future of the Federal Reserve’s Balance Sheet,” also at the U.S. Monetary Policy Forum. He speaks at 1:30 PM ET (18:30 GMT).

3. Earnings Reports Thinner, but Still Coming

The crush of reports from the December quarter are starting to wind down.

Look for reports from:

– Royal Bank Of Canada (NYSE:).

– AutoNation (NYSE:), the big national automobile dealership chain.

– Real estate investment trust WP Carey (NYSE:.

– Natural gas transporter Cheniere Energy Partners (NYSE:).

– Ruth’s Hospitality Group (NASDAQ:), the parent of the Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse chain.

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Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.

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Economic Calendar – Top 5 Things to Watch This Week

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Investing.com – Market participants are bracing for heightened volatility as the coming week will be dominated by several market-moving events.

The Federal Reserve will hold its first policy meeting of the year on Tuesday and Wednesday, with investors hoping for more clues on how patient it will be before raising interest rates again.

There is also the January jobs report on Friday, with the effects of furloughed government workers potentially impacting the unemployment rate.

In earnings, results from Apple (NASDAQ:) on Tuesday, Microsoft (NASDAQ:) on Wednesday and Amazon (NASDAQ:) on Thursday will be high on the agenda.

Meanwhile, markets will be keeping abreast of the next round of trade talks between the U.S. and China to see if any more news materializes amid recent signs the world’s two biggest economies are working to resolve their differences.

Elsewhere, Brexit will also occupy minds as British Prime Minister Theresa May attempts to win support for her tweaked divorce deal in parliament.

Ahead of the coming week, Investing.com has compiled a list of the five biggest events on the economic calendar that are most likely to affect the markets.

1. Federal Reserve Rate Decision

The is not expected to take action on interest rates at the conclusion of its two-day policy meeting at 2:00PM ET (19:00 GMT) on Wednesday, keeping it in a range between 2.25%-2.5%.

Fed Chair will hold what will be a closely-watched press conference 30 minutes after the release of the Fed’s , as investors look for greater signs of the central bank’s likely rate hike trajectory through the rest of the year.

Any hint that the central bank is closer to ending its runoff will also be in focus.

The Fed raised interest rates four times last year and has signaled it will probably lift borrowing costs twice in 2019, though some central bank officials have said they will be patient and cautious in raising rates as risks to the U.S. economy mount.

2. U.S. Jobs Report

The U.S. Labor Department will release the nonfarm payrolls report for January at 8:30AM ET (13:30 GMT) on Friday.

The consensus forecast is that the data will show jobs growth of , after adding 312,000 positions in December, while the unemployment rate is seen dipping to from 3.9%.

However, most of the focus will likely be on average hourly earnings figures, which are expected to rise from a year earlier, the same gain reported in December.

This week’s calendar also features data on U.S. personal income and spending, which includes personal consumption expenditures (PCE) inflation figures, the Fed’s preferred metric for inflation.

Other top-tier economic data due this week includes the CB consumer confidence report, ADP (NASDAQ:) private sector payrolls, as well as the ISM surveys on manufacturing and service sector activity.

3. Apple, Microsoft, Amazon Highlight Busy Week of Earnings

Three of the four biggest companies in the world all report in the week ahead, as do about a quarter of the and nearly half the stocks as the fourth-quarter earnings season gathers pace.

Tech bellwethers , , and report respectively on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Facebook (NASDAQ:), the sixth largest stock by market cap, also reports on Wednesday.

Some of other high-profile tech names reporting this week are Caterpillar (NYSE:), AK Steel (NYSE:), and Whirlpool (NYSE:), all due Monday.

Tuesday sees Verizon (NYSE:), 3M (NYSE:), Harley-Davidson (NYSE:), Pfizer (NYSE:), Lockheed Martin (NYSE:), Advanced Micro Devices (NASDAQ:), and eBay (NASDAQ:) report.

Boeing (NYSE:), McDonald’s (NYSE:), AT&T (NYSE:), Alibaba (NYSE:), Tesla (NASDAQ:), Visa (NYSE:), PayPal (NASDAQ:), Wynn Resorts (NASDAQ:), Qualcomm (NASDAQ:), and (NYSE:) are on the docket for Wednesday.

Results from General Electric (NYSE:), United Parcel Service (NYSE:), Mastercard (NYSE:), Raytheon (NYSE:), Blackstone (NYSE:), Sprint (NYSE:), DowDuPont (NYSE:), Altria (NYSE:), Northrop Grumman (NYSE:), and ConocoPhillips (NYSE:) are due Thursday.

Finally, corporate results from ExxonMobil (NYSE:), Chevron (NYSE:), Merck (NYSE:), Honeywell (NYSE:), Madison Square (NYSE:) Garden (NYSE:), and Cigna (NYSE:) round up the week on Friday.

4. U.S.-China Trade Talks

The United States and China will have in-depth discussions on economic and trade issues during Chinese Vice Premier Liu He’s U.S. visit on Wednesday and Thursday.

That follows lower-level negotiations held in Beijing earlier this month to resolve the bitter dispute between the world’s two largest economies by March 2, when the Trump administration is scheduled to increase tariffs on $ 200 billion worth of Chinese goods.

Washington and Beijing have been engaged in a trade spat for more than a year, with both countries slapping tariffs on several of each other’s products. The standoff has raised concern in the market about a potential in global economic growth.

5. Brexit ‘Plan B’ Debate

Investors will keep a watchful eye on the British parliament’s debate on Prime Minister Theresa May’s proposed , as well as alternative plans put forward by lawmakers, including some that seek to delay Britain’s March 29 exit from the European Union.

The opposition and many ruling party members will likely back an amendment providing for a nine-month extension to Brexit should a deal not be agreed by Feb. 26.

Deliberations are set for Tuesday.

— Reuters contributed to this report

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Economy News

Economic Calendar – Top 5 Things to Watch This Week

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Investing.com – Trade rhetoric could hang over the market in the coming week, as investors watch further developments surrounding the ongoing trade spat between the U.S. and China.

Headlines on trade were a positive last week, including one that the U.S. was considering and another that China was offering to .

The holiday-shortened week ahead also marks the first big week of the fourth-quarter earnings season on Wall Street, with nearly 60 S&P companies set to report.

On the data front, economic reports will be limited due to the government shutdown. Regularly scheduled durable goods will not be available, but there will be existing home sales data on Tuesday.

U.S. markets will remain closed on Monday for Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

Elsewhere, China will be the first major economy to report when it publishes its GDP numbers this week, amid warnings from analysts that the ongoing trade dispute with the U.S. was likely to drag on economic activity.

Meanwhile, in central bank news, monetary policy announcements from the European Central Bank and the Bank of Japan will be on the agenda, though it’s highly unlikely either will rock the boat policy-wise.

Political headlines will also be in focus as investors watch developments surrounding the , now in its 29th day, and British Prime Minister Theresa May’s .

Another headliner this week will be the in Davos, Switzerland, which kicks off on Tuesday. The forum will not be attended by U.S. President Donald Trump or representatives of his administration as a result of the government shutdown. Theresa May and French President Emmanuel Macron also won’t be in attendance.

Ahead of the coming week, Investing.com has compiled a list of the five biggest events on the economic calendar that are most likely to affect the markets.

1. U.S.-China Trade Optimism

Markets will also be keeping abreast of the ongoing trade spat between the U.S. and China to see if any more news materializes amid recent signs the world’s two biggest economies are working to resolve their differences.

U.S. President said on Saturday there has been progress toward a trade deal with China, but denied that he was considering lifting tariffs on Chinese imports.

“Things are going very well with China and with trade,” he told reporters at the White House, adding that he had seen some “false reports” indicating that U.S. tariffs on Chinese products would be lifted.

“If we make a deal certainly we would not have sanctions and if we don’t make a deal we will,” Trump said.

Chinese Vice Premier Liu He will visit the U.S. on Jan. 30 and 31 for the next round of trade negotiations with Washington.

That follows lower-level negotiations held in Beijing last week to resolve the bitter dispute between the world’s two largest economies by March 2, when the Trump administration is scheduled to increase tariffs on $ 200 billion worth of Chinese goods.

2. Fourth-Quarter Earnings Season Kicks into High Gear

There are about 60 companies reporting earnings in the week ahead, including seven stocks, in what will be the second big week of the fourth-quarter earnings season.

Tuesday sees Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:), Halliburton (NYSE:), Travelers (NYSE:), and Steel Dynamics (NASDAQ:) post results in the morning, while IBM (NYSE:) is due in after the close along with TD Ameritrade (NASDAQ:), and Capital One (NYSE:).

On Wednesday, Procter & Gamble (NYSE:), Comcast (NASDAQ:), United Technologies (NYSE:), Abbott Labs (NYSE:), and Kimberly-Clark (NYSE:) report earnings in pre-market hours, while Ford (NYSE:), Texas Instruments (NASDAQ:), United Rentals (NYSE:), Lam Research (NASDAQ:), and Las Vegas Sands (NYSE:) will post results in the evening.

American Airlines (NASDAQ:), Southwest Airlines (NYSE:), JetBlue Airways (NASDAQ:), Textron (NYSE:), Freeport-McMoran (NYSE:), and Bristol-Myers Squibb (NYSE:) are on the docket Thursday morning. After the close, results are expected from Intel (NASDAQ:), Starbucks (NASDAQ:), Western Digital (NASDAQ:), E-TRADE (NASDAQ:), and Intuitive Surgical (NASDAQ:).

Finally, corporate results from AbbVie (NYSE:), NextEra Energy (NYSE:) and DR Horton (NYSE:) round up the week on Friday.

3. China Q4 GDP

China is to release fourth-quarter GDP figures on Monday morning.

The report is expected to show the world’s second-largest economy grew in the October-December quarter from a year earlier, slowing from the previous quarter’s 6.5% pace and matching levels last seen in early 2009 during the global financial crisis.

The Asian nation will also publish data on December industrial production, fixed asset investment and retail sales along with the GDP report.

Recent data has started to show that China’s economy may be losing steam, raising concerns about the potential fallout from the ongoing U.S.-China trade dispute.

The U.S. has slapped tariffs on more than half of over $ 500 billion in Chinese imports, for which China has retaliated, after several rounds of negotiations failed to resolve U.S. complaints over Chinese industrial policies and lack of market access in China.

4. European Central Bank Policy Meeting

The is all but certain to keep interest rates at their current record low levels at the conclusion of its monetary policy meeting at 12:45 GMT (7:45AM ET) on Thursday.

President will hold a closely-watched press conference 45 minutes after the rate announcement as investors seek further clues on when the central bank plans to start hiking borrowing costs.

After ending its asset-purchase program at its previous meeting in December, markets expected the ECB would follow with a rate rise in the third quarter of 2019.

But a barrage of weak data suggesting growth has slowed prompted traders to push back expectations for a rate hike to the fourth quarter of this year.

This week’s calendar also features flash January PMI surveys on manufacturing and service sector activity, which should give further indication of how the region’s economy is coping with global trade conflicts and messy Brexit negotiations.

5. Bank of Japan Policy Meeting

The is widely expected to keep monetary policy unchanged at its two-day rate review ending on Wednesday, maintaining a pledge to guide short-term interest rates at minus 0.1% and long-term bond yields around zero percent.

It will also issue a quarterly report analyzing Japan’s economy that will include fresh growth and inflation forecasts through the fiscal year ending in March 2021.

BoJ Governor will hold a press conference afterward to discuss the decision.

According to sources familiar with the central bank’s thinking, the BoJ is expected to cut its inflation forecasts to reflect recent declines in oil prices, but maintain its upbeat assessment that Japan’s economy will keep expanding moderately.

— Reuters contributed to this report

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Economy News

Economic Calendar – Top 5 Things to Watch This Week

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Investing.com – Trade-related headlines are likely to be the main driver of sentiment this week, as investors look ahead to a meeting between on the sidelines of the G20 summit in Argentina.

Washington and Beijing have been engaged in a trade spat for the most part of the year, with both countries slapping tariffs on several of each other’s imports.

The tariffs have raised concern in the market about a potential slowdown in global economic growth.

Meanwhile, in Europe, will be in focus after European Union leaders endorsed Theresa May’s Brexit plans on Sunday, setting up a showdown with lawmakers in her own country.

Global financial markets will also pay close attention to comments from a handful of Federal Reserve officials, including , for additional insight into the outlook for monetary policy in the months ahead.

The Fed is widely expected to announce its fourth rate increase of 2018 in December, but investors are beginning to question how many rate hikes it can implement next year, having noted the cautious tone creeping into policymakers’ comments of late.

On the data front, there is important third-quarter this week, which should lend further support to the notion that the economy is on solid footing.

Elsewhere, traders will also focus on flash .

In commodities, market players will be watching , which continued their collapse last week to reach their lowest level in more than a year, amid signs of swelling global inventories ahead of an important OPEC gathering next month.

Ahead of the coming week, Investing.com has compiled a list of the five biggest events on the economic calendar that are most likely to affect the markets.

1. Trump-Xi Meeting

With global growth increasingly suffering from frictions over tariffs and trade between the world’s two largest economies, tensions will come to a head when Donald Trump and Xi Jinping meet on the sidelines of a two-day in Buenos Aires, which starts Friday.

It will be the first time the leaders have met since Trump imposed tariffs on $ 250 billion of Chinese imports to force concessions from Beijing on greater access to Chinese markets, forced technology transfer and intellectual property theft. China responded with import tariffs on U.S. goods.

Market players are not optimistic about any progress at the Trump-Xi talks, but are leaving room for surprises. There is hope that both sides will show a willingness to negotiate and hold off on a further escalation of tariffs.

Tensions between the two countries have dominated economic headlines this year, with both sides imposing tit-for-tat tariffs on each other’s products.

Trump has threatened to impose tariffs on all remaining Chinese imports – about $ 267 billion more in goods – if Beijing fails to address U.S. demands.

2. Brexit Developments

European Union leaders gathered in Brussels on Sunday to officially endorse UK Prime Minister Theresa May’s withdrawal agreement on how the UK will leave the bloc in March of next year.

But the EU’s acceptance of the deal has only enraged some pro-Brexit politicians in the UK, who believe that May is making too many concessions to the EU.

That now sets up a showdown between May and lawmakers in her own country, as the UK leader nears a crucial vote on her proposals next month. The Parliamentary vote is likely to be on December 11.

Lawmakers in the opposition Labour party, the Liberal Democrats and the Scottish National Party have all indicated that they will vote against the deal. The Northern Irish DUP (Democratic Unionist Party) party, which is propping up May’s government in Parliament, also said it would vote against it.

Failure could lead to May being toppled as prime minister and significantly raise the risk of a no-deal Brexit.

3. Fed Chair Powell Speaks

A number of Fed speeches will get market attention in the week ahead, as traders watch for further clues on interest rates.

Topping the agenda will be remarks from Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell, who will be speaking at the Economic Club of New York at 12:00PM ET (1700GMT) Wednesday.

Speeches from Fed Vice Chair Richard Clarida, Atlanta Fed President Raphael Bostic, Chicago Fed President Charles Evans, Kansas City Fed President Esther George, and New York Fed President John Williams (NYSE:) will also be in focus.

Their speeches will be useful for investors who have been scaling back their expectations for future rate hikes following recent remarks from a number of Fed officials that were interpreted as dovish.

Also on the agenda are of the last Fed meeting, which will be released Thursday.

A fourth rate hike for this year is expected next month, though cautious comments by Fed officials about the global economic outlook suggested the central bank could slow the pace of its monetary policy tightening cycle.

4. U.S. 3Q GDP – Second Estimate

The U.S. Commerce Department is to release revised figures on third-quarter economic growth at 8:30AM ET (1330GMT) Wednesday.

The data is expected to show that the economy grew at a annual rate in the three months ending Sept. 30, a slight upward revision from a preliminary estimate of 3.5%.

Besides the GDP report, this week’s rather light economic calendar also features data on U.S. personal income and spending, which includes personal consumption expenditures (PCE) inflation figures, the Fed’s preferred metric for inflation.

The latest CB consumer confidence survey, as well as the October readings on pending and new home sales will also capture the market’s attention.

Recent data has painted a worrying picture of the U.S. housing market, which is struggling with rising mortgage rates and tight inventory.

5. Euro Zone Flash Inflation

The euro zone will publish flash inflation figures for November at 5:00AM ET (1000GMT) on Friday.

The consensus forecast is that the report will show consumer prices rose , a tad slower than the 2.2% increase a month earlier. The core figure, without volatile energy and food prices, is seen holding steady at , unchanged from the preceding month.

Germany, France, Italy and Spain will produce their own CPI reports throughout the week.

The European Central Bank kept its policy unchanged last month, staying on track to end bond purchases at the end of this year. However, slowing growth, weak business sentiment, and rising political instability have seen markets dial back bets on a December 2019 rate hike.

Fresh comments from ECB President , who is scheduled to speak twice during the week, may shed further light on the ECB’s monetary policy outlook.

Stay up-to-date on all of this week’s economic events by visiting: http://www.investing.com/economic-calendar/

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Atomic watch dog calls on North Korea to re-admit nuke inspectors

Last Updated Nov 23, 2018 2:23 AM EST

VIENNA — The head of the U.N.’s atomic watchdog Thursday called on North Korea to allow inspectors back into the country to monitor its nuclear program. Speaking at a board meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Director General Yukiya Amano noted that Pyongyang had in September talked about denuclearization measures including the “permanent dismantlement of the nuclear facilities in Yongbyon” — a reactor where it produces plutonium.

Amano said there has been activity observed at Yongbyon, but “without access the agency cannot confirm the nature and purpose of these activities.”

At a news conference later Thursday, he said he couldn’t elaborate on when exactly the activity was observed.

IAEA inspectors were expelled from North Korea in 2009 but Amano said the agency continues to prepare for their possible re-admittance.

Amano told CBS News’ Pamela Falk last year that the agency would be able to send inspectors in quickly, if asked, and that the team that had inspected North Korean sites in the past was still in place.   

“The agency continues to enhance its readiness to play an essential role in verifying (North Korea’s) nuclear program if a political agreement is reached among countries concerned,” he said. “I again call upon (North Korea) to comply fully with its obligations under relevant resolutions of the U.N. Security Council and of the IAEA board, to cooperate promptly with the agency and to resolve all outstanding issues.”

On the other hand, Amano told board members that Iran continues to abide by the deal reached in 2015 with major world powers that aimed at preventing Tehran from building atomic weapons in exchange for economic incentives.

He reiterated the agency’s findings in a report distributed to member states earlier this month that “Iran is implementing its nuclear-related commitments under the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action.”

The issue has grown more complicated since the U.S. withdrew unilaterally in May from the deal and then re-imposed sanctions. Iran’s economy has been struggling ever since and its currency has plummeted in value.

The other signatories to the deal — Germany, Britain, France, Russia and China — are continuing to try to make it work.

Amano stressed that “it is essential that Iran continues to fully implement” its commitments.

In its full report, the IAEA said its inspectors continue to have access to all sites in Iran that it needs to visit and that inspectors confirmed Iran has kept within limits of heavy water and low-enriched uranium stockpiles.

“The agency continues to verify the non-diversion of nuclear material declared by Iran under its safeguards agreement,” Amano said. “Evaluations regarding the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities in Iran continue.”

© 2018 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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